28 February 2013

A mosquito ?

Thought you would find this technology interesting.


Att00001

Is this a mosquito? No. It's an insect spy drone for urban areas, already in production, funded by the US Government (DARPA). It can be remotely controlled and is equipped with a camera and a microphone. It can land on you, and it may have the potential to take a DNA sample or leave RFID tracking nanotechnology on your skin. It can fly through an open window, or it can attach to your clothing until you take it in your home. Given their propensity to request macro-sized drones for surveillance, one is left with little doubt that police and military may look into these gadgets next.

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How do you decide whom to marry? (written by kids)

1.HOW DO YOU DECIDE WHOM TO MARRY? 

-You got to find somebody who likes the same stuff. Like, if you like sports, she should like it that you like sports, and she should keep the chips and dip coming. -- Alan, age 10

-No person really decides before they grow up who they're going to marry. God decides it all way before, and you get to find out later who you're stuck with. -- Kristen, age 10

2. WHAT IS THE RIGHT AGE TO GET MARRIED?

Twenty-three is the best age because you know the person FOREVER by then. -- Camille, age 10

3. HOW CAN A STRANGER TELL IF TWO PEOPLE ARE MARRIED?

You might have to guess, based on whether they seem to be yelling at the same kids. -- Derrick, age 8

4. WHAT DO YOU THINK YOUR MOM AND DAD HAVE IN COMMON?

Both don't want any more kids.  -- Lori, age 8

5. WHAT DO MOST PEOPLE DO ON A DATE?

-Dates are for having fun, and people should use them to get to know each other. Even boys have something to say if you listen long enough. -- Lynnette, age 8(isn't she a treasure)

-On the first date, they just tell each other lies and that usually gets them interested enough to go for a second date. -- Martin, age 10

6. WHEN IS IT OKAY TO KISS SOMEONE?

-When they're rich. -- Pam, age 7

-The law says you have to be eighteen, so I wouldn't want to mess with that. -- Curt, age 7

-The rule goes like this: If you kiss someone, then you should marry them and have kids with them. It's the right thing to do. -- Howard, age 8

7. IS IT BETTER TO BE SINGLE OR MARRIED?

It's better for girls to be single but not for boys. Boys need someone to clean up after them.
-- Anita, age 9 (bless you child)

8. HOW WOULD THE WORLD BE DIFFERENT IF PEOPLE DIDN'T GET MARRIED?

There sure would be a lot of kids to explain, wouldn't there? -- Kelvin, age 8


And the #1 Favorite is:

9. HOW WOULD YOU MAKE A MARRIAGE WORK?

Tell your wife that she looks pretty, even if she looks like a dump truck.-- Ricky, age 10

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24 February 2013

Weekend cartoons

38 Maps

Great post of 38 Maps you never knew you needed but will enjoy looking at:

1. This map shows every area code in which Ludacris has "hoes":

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2. This is what the world would look like if the water and land masses were inverted:

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Source: ircimg.net

3. This is how much space the Great Lakes would take up if they were in Europe:

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4. Here's how much space the world's population would take up if everyone lived in one city:

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5. This is a map of every country England has ever invaded:

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(That's all but 22 countries.)
Source: wtf.nl

6. This map shows the population density in the United States by decade:

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Source: fr.reddit.com

7. Here's a map of everything New Yorkers call 311 to complain about most:

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8. This is what the U.S. might look like if state borders were redrawn to evenly distribute the population:

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19 February 2013

Hollywood's beautiful women

Thought you movie buffs might enjoy this very clever, computer-generated morph of some of Hollywood's most beautiful women. 
 
Danny Steiber: Most beautiful women - http://youtube.googleapis.com/v/Q5XetQeFu-0&autoplay

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13 February 2013

Natural camouflage


These Incredible images show animals doing a disappearing act when predators are near.

Study each picture well, before reading the caption

Can you spot the 'invisible animal'? Incredible images show nature's disappearing act when predators are near

  • These animals are trying their utmost to fool predators by blending into landscapes all over the world
  • They were taken by photographer Art Wolfe over a period of 35 years, for his work 'Vanishing Act'
Some hide under lily pads, some dissolve into the bark of a tree while others slip seamlessly into the snow, either to hide from a hungry predator or silently stalk an unwitting prey.
But the one thing from which they cannot hide is the all-seeing camera lens of photographer Art Wolfe.
He has spent over 35 years roaming the deserts of Africa, the rainforests of South America, the mountains of the United States and snow plains of Canada to capture wildlife at its most invisible.

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It's white in front of you! A willow ptarmigan in winter plumage, hidden on a brushy slope near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. The animals are trying their utmost to fool predators but that's not enough to deceive international photographer Art Wolfe
He has travelled through every continent in the world in tireless pursuit of more subjects for his chef-d'oeuvre 'Vanishing Act' that dates back to the 1980s.
Art said: 'Throughout my career as a nature photographer, I have challenged myself to present new perspectives on well-documented subjects.
'Like most of my projects this collection has been a long time in the making.


'Finding and filming animals on location is an exhilarating and painstaking process. I'm still adding to the project even now.
'Conventional wildlife photography calls for isolating the subject by selective focus, this way the animal is clearly defined.

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Having a giraffe: A Giraffe in Transvaal, South Africa. Wolfe's 35-year career has spanned every continent as he has followed his passion for the environment


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Can't see the wolf from the trees: A wolf peering out from behind a tree trunk in an autumn Montana forest


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Eye spy: A spectacled caiman in Llanos, Venezuela. Wolfe works to make it visually challenging to the viewer by using depth of field, scale and placement and confusing the subject

Cunning tricks: A Great Horned Owl uses colour in its plumage to disappear in a temperate forest in Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, left, while an American Pika performs a vanishing act in the Cascade Range of Washington, right


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Leaf me alone: A Mealy or Blue-crowned parrot disappears like just another leaf in the lush Central American rainforest, Chan Chich, Belize
'Photographers always want to show off their subject. And yet, is this really the way an animal is viewed by the human eye? Not quite.
'We don't have the isolating abilities that a telephoto lens provides. On most occasions an animal remains somewhat concealed by the clutter of its natural habitat-a necessity of survival for both predator and prey.
'I have basically employed three different photographic approaches and purposely worked to enhance the difficulty to find the camouflaged subject-as difficult as it is in the wild to see animals that do not want to be seen.

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Snake eyes: A horned adder matches the colour of the sand in the Namib Desert, Namibia, where they bury themselves using a swimming motion to disappear beneath the hot surface


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Can you spot me? A Leopard conceals herself in vegetation at the base of a tree in Kruger National Park, Transvaal, South Africa


Rock and hole: A gyrfalcon at their nest built on a cliff, left, and a California Ground Squirrel blends in with its rocky environment, right


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Bark and hide: A Great Gray Owl positions itself in front of a similar pattern to take advantage of his camouflage in Oregon, United States
'Since it is impossible to capture all the distractions to the senses of an entire landscape in a photo, I worked to make it visually challenging by using depth of field, scale and placement and confusing the subject.'
Art is also a successful book publisher and television producer. He has published at least one book a year since 1989.
The 61-year-old from Seattle said: 'It is in the wild places, where the edge of the earth meets the corners of the sky, the human spirit is fed.'

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Invisible: A male Spotted Deer disappears among sun-dappled vegetation in Ranthambore National Park, Rajasthan, India


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Stop monkeying around: A family of Japanese Macaques disappear amid their rocky habitat on Honshu Island, Japan


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I'm white over here! White-tailed Ptarmigan in Churchill, Manitoba, Canada


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The long grass: An Impala hiding in vegetation in Botswana's Chobe National Park, Africa


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A sandy place to hide: A cheetah cub disguised against the Kalahari Desert, South Africa


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Water good place to hide: A Common Snipe, well hidden in the shoreline vegetation of a Minnesota stream


Painstaking: Mr Wolfe, right, says finding and filming animals on location, such as this wandering tattler chick in Wrangell-Saint Ellias National Park, left, is 'an exhilarating and painstaking process'


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Out of sight hawk: A nighthawk resting on rocks where it blends into its surroundings in eastern Washington


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Snow way I'll be spotted here: A coyote camouflaged in the surrounding brush at the edge of a snow dusted field, Washington State, USA


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Precarious perch: Two Klipspringers camouflaged against a rocky outcrop in Chobe, Botswana


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Branching out: A well-concealed blue dacnis takes a rest in foliage in Panama

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2253701/Invisible-animals-These-Incredible-images-animals-doing-disappearing-act-predators-near.html#ixzz2KqDCGg00 
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